• LECTURE TWO – LEFT BRAIN, RIGHT BRAIN, RIGHT SHAME

    Iain McGilchrist(2009) argues that the left and right hemispheres of the brain are distinct and that the right hemisphere is not only more creative but the most important or primary. He argues that in cultural terms, it has been overtaken in the west by the left hemisphere in a reversal of the proper order of things. This talk applies his thinking to drawing and designing in the university and beyond. Students are invited to participate in the debate through a series of exercises and discussion.

    drawing, apprehending, tactical thinking, separating, joining

    Iain McGilchrist, The Master and hIs Emissary (2009);

    David Crow, Left to Right, the cultural shift from words to pictures (2006)

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    Memory and line

    Key Words – motivation, expression, information, code, recovery, visual-verbal

    How does the line relate to memory? What is the motivation for such mark making? What are the seminal changes in that mark making through time? What happens when the line becomes a language system? What are we doing: recording, registering, remembering, recovering? How might contemporary technologies affect both our memories and the way we create lines?

    Key texts

    Tim Ingold, Lines – a brief history (2007), [Introduction and Chapter two]

    Richard Hollis, Graphic Design – a concise history (2001)

    • Reading List for Memory and Lines      GMD-CTS Lectures Spring Term 2015

      http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/themes/writing/historic_writing.aspx

      Buzan, Tony. (2006) Use your Head.  BBC Active.

      Foer, Joshua. (2011)  Moonwalking with Einstein- the art and science of remembering everything. The Penguin Press.

      Chatwin, Bruce. (1987) Songlines.

      Ghandava. The Origin of Cave Images & Paintings. BBC Documentary (youtube.com)

      Hollis, Richard. (2001) Graphic art:  a Concise History. Thames & Hudson. World of art.

      Ingold, Tim. (2007) Lines.  Routledge Taylor & Francis group

      Kandinsky, Wassily. (1979) Point and Line to Plane. Dover Publications.

      Klee, Paul. (1961) Notebooks, Vol. 1: The Thinking Eye, ed. J. Spiller, trans. R. Manheim, London: LundHumphries.

      The Eye and the hand: memory, identity and clairvoyants’ narratives in England, in J. Cambell and J. Harbord (eds), Temporalities, Autobiography and Everyday Life,’ Manchester:  Man Uni Press

      Yeats, Frances.  (1966) The Art of Memory.  Routledge & Kegan Paul. Thames and Hudson

      Essay Titles

      1.  Evaluate a range of memory systems in relation to the lines (metaphorical or actual) they employ. Which are the most effective, bearing in mind memory theory and differing contexts.

      2.  Le Corbusier, 20th century modernist architect, is quoted in ‘Lines’ as saying that the man of reason ‘walks in a straight line because he has a goal and knows where he is going’ (Le Corbusier, Urbanisme, 1924: 274): can this be applied to the searches we make daily on the internet? Are the lines of inquiry linear or lateral, and how much freedom do we have to create our own traces?

      3. Compare and contrast two maps – either taken from two cultures, times or perspectives. What kinds of linearity, style and focus are in evidence, and what do these tell you about the map-makers, their perspectives and purposes?

    • HARRIET EDWARDS: LECTURE TWO – LEFT BRAIN, RIGHT BRAIN, RIGHT SHAME

      Iain McGilchrist(2009) argues that the left and right hemispheres of the brain are distinct and that the right hemisphere is not only more creative but the most important or primary. He argues that in cultural terms, it has been overtaken in the west by the left hemisphere in a reversal of the proper order of things. This talk applies his thinking to drawing and designing in the university and beyond. Students are invited to participate in the debate through a series of exercises and discussion.

      drawing, apprehending, tactical thinking, separating, joining

      Iain McGilchrist, The Master and hIs Emissary (2009); 

      David Crow, Left to Right, the cultural shift from words to pictures (2006)

       

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